Dad, Can I Trust You?

“How can I trust God?”

Go on…

“He’s my father right? Like my Heavenly Father?”

Talk to me…

Through her tears she tells me “My dad doesn’t love me. He says mean things to me. He won’t spend time with me. I shared something with him once and he told others about it. I can never trust him again”.

There was a moment last night when I looked around the room – a room filled with about 50 teens – and witnessed an indescribable pain – the kind that no young person should ever have to feel. It was the wound from their father. I dare say that more than half of the young people were dealing with this wound.

Dads – we have the absolute critical responsibility in the lives of our children (young and old) to either help them draw into their Heavenly Father, or fall away from Him.

I am speaking to my own heart too.

What are you doing – I mean DOING right now that is causing your children to fall more in love with God? You dad, are their earthly example of their Heavenly Daddy. Can they trust you? Do you love them unconditionally? Not just lip service, but in a real, tangible, palatable way. Or are you disconnected, aloof, too busy, or more concerned with the rules instead of relationship?

I wish that my conversation with that young lady was my first and last of the evening. But as we said amen and I looked up, another teen was waiting.

“Mr. Roy, can I talk to you?”


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3 responses to this post.

  1. I heard it was amazing.

  2. I used to have a tinge of doubt to John Eldredge’s claim that we ALL have a wound from our fathers (reference his book “Wild at Heart”). My dad is a great man. He (and his generation) were consumed with “providing for the family” and was not too involved in my life – but I always knew he loved me and my brothers & sisters. It took me a while but the sixth or seventh time through the study with my men’s group over the years God confirmed this notion in my heart. I’ve got plenty of wounds – some are still fresh. But, I do have wounds from my dad.

    And, as a dad, I’m keenly aware that I’ve wounded my kids as well. As I am coming to understand Mr. Eldredge’s statement, I have come to understand that if we ALL have wounds from our dads, then as dads, we will ALL wound our children. The difference is – we’re aware of it now. So, we need to talk this over with our kids – come clean – repent. This will do more to show our kids we’re following God than anything.

    Hook – I’m so glad these kids have you, bro. Keep up the good work.

  3. I used to have a tinge of doubt to John Eldredge’s claim that we ALL have a wound from our fathers (reference his book “Wild at Heart”). My dad is a great man. He (and his generation) were consumed with “providing for the family” and was not too involved in my life – but I always knew he loved me and my brothers & sisters. It took me a while but the sixth or seventh time through the study with my men’s group over the years God confirmed this notion in my heart. I’ve got plenty of wounds – some are still fresh. But, I do have wounds from my dad.

    And, as a dad, I’m keenly aware that I’ve wounded my kids as well. As I am coming to understand Mr. Eldredge’s statement, I have come to understand that if we ALL have wounds from our dads, then as dads, we will ALL wound our children. The difference is – we’re aware of it now. So, we need to talk this over with our kids – come clean – repent. This will do more to show our kids we’re following God than anything.

    Hook – I’m so glad these kids have you, bro. Keep up the good work.

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